Articles

Labor: Demon, Sovereign and Savior

When we control the production of coal, we hold the vitals of our society right in our hands. I can squeeze, twist, and pull until we get the inevitable...

In Illinois: The Ghost of John L. Lewis

Galatia (pop. 1,023) sits alongside the two-lane tarmac of Highway 34 in Southern Illinois like hips on a snake. Barely. There is a cluster of neat...

LABOR: Fighter's Retreat

Over the telephone, the editor of the bimonthly United Mine Workers Journal heard the unmistakable rumbling voice of U.M.W. President John Llewellyn Lewis:...

TRIALS: Boyle Down

Whenever the U.S. Government did something he did not like, John L. Lewis, the colorful, powerful president of the United Mine Workers of America, would...

LABOR: Power of Persuasion

John L. Lewis, whose life has been one long noisy scrap, reached his 70th birthday this week, bellowing and posturing through the toughest scrap of his life...

LABOR: Lewis Rebuffed

"Legal! What the hell is legal?" snorted William L. ("Big Bill") Hutcheson, florid, mule-mannered czar of the 400,000 United Brotherhood of Carpenters &...

LABOR: On with the Truce

Before 3,000 convention delegates last week, the United Mine Workers' Chief John L. Lewis angrily laid down the law on wildcat strikes in the coal industry...

LABOR: Coal Strike

John L. Lewis met his dilemma as only John L. Lewis can. His 375,000 soft coal miners stayed out on strike against a ruling of the Administration's Wage...

National Affairs: Mr. Taylor and I

"Once again, Mr. Taylor and I have been able to render a service at a time when it is in the national interest and in a manner that has secured the gracious...

LABOR: The Big Three

Once upon a time there were three ambitious men in the United Mine Workers. John L. Lewis kicked out William Green, and then there were two. John L. Lewis had...

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