Articles

Paleontology: World's First Tall Tree

Swedish Explorer Johan Gunnar Andersson discovered several of its fossilized branches on Norway's Bear Island in 1899. Remnants of its fanlike leaves have...

Paleontology: New Life for Gondwanaland

Serendipity struck a group of Ohio State University geologists last December as they picked away at the stratified sediment in an ancient stream bed high in...

Paleontology: The Monster in the Accelerator

The two-mile tunnel that slices through the rolling countryside behind Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., was built for one purpose only: to house a...

Paleontology: The Missing Ammosaurus

In the fall of 1884, when he heard that dinosaur remains had been discovered in a stone quarry near Manchester, Conn., Yale University's Othniel Charles...

Paleontology: Fever Chart for Fossils

Working with bits of bone, fossilized impressions in stone and educated intuition, scientists have cleverly deduced the appearance, weight, speed and even...

Paleontology: Older than Ever

While the unfolding mystery of Stonehenge traces some surprising knowledge of astronomy back to Stone Age Britons, the steadily growing evidence of...

Paleontology: Gobi's Treasure of Bones

The 35 tons of fossils might well have represented the lifetime discoveries of any of the delegates to the Paris paleontologic conference. Included in the...

Paleontology: Fossil Finder

As a high school student, Andy Knoll was an avid fossil collector, but it never occurred to him that he would someday become a paleontologist. Where he came...

Paleontology: The Man They Ate for Dinner

In an election year, most politicians are content to let buried skeletons lie. Not Washington's Democratic Senator Warren Magnuson—although he is up for...

Paleontology: Overkill, Not Overchill

What ever happened to the saber-toothed tiger, the dire wolf, the mammoth, the giant beaver, and more than 100 other species of large mammals that once...

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