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Washington's Man from Nowhere

"Hang a lamb chop in the window," was the advice legendary hostess Perle Mesta gave those who wanted to make a place for themselves in the capital. Craig Spence,...

THE CAPITAL: Widow from Oklahoma

Last week, in a richly furnished room overlooking the lights of Washington, the Vice President of the United States danced a little solo to the strains of an...

THE CAPITAL: Life Among the Party-Givers

Now that wealthy Perle Mesta was moving to Luxembourg to be the U.S. minister, something was missing in the capital's social life. Who would take her place as...

National Affairs: So Sudden

Last week Perle Mesta got her walking papers. A loyal Democrat, she had submitted her resignation as U.S. Minister to Luxembourg to President Eisenhower three...

FOREIGN RELATIONS: Gem of an Appointment

Missouri's earnest, plodding Forrest C. Donnell is one U.S. Senator who has never sampled the hospitality of Washington's No. 1 hostess, Perle Mesta. Last...

The Home: Ormes & the Man

For 18 years Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson, though millionaire ranch owners back in Texas, put up, when in the capital, in a modest, nondescript house on the...

Letters, Apr. 4, 1949

Social Splurges & Bad Taste Sir: "America's mission is to vulgarize the world," said Thomas Carlyle. I think he is borne out by your account of the doings in...

People: Hands Across the Sea

"I believe we of England have a harmonious feeling for Southern women," observed Gertrude Lawrence, who will play the Southern mother in the movie version of...

People: The Working Class

Manhattan's Communist Daily Worker seized the occasion of the 132nd anniversary of Walt Whitman's birth to claim him as its very own. "How," cried the Worker,...

WOMEN: An Oyster for Perle

For Perle Mesta the call of duty sounded last week above the merry tinkle of cocktail glasses and the clatter of knives & forks. President Truman named his...

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