Articles

LABOR: In Hillman's Shoes

The leaders of C.I.O. could think of only one man to be director of C.I.O.'s Political Action Committee. It was Phil Murray, and Murray already had his hands...

LABOR: End of Strife

Stumping the country in 1944, John Bricker declared: "Sidney Hillman's convention cared no more for the Democratic party than for the Constitution of the...

LABOR: Within the Law

With might & main, the House committee investigating campaign expenditures pried into Sidney Hillman's P.A.C. last week, searching for some legal misstep...

LABOR: The New Force

The most important politician at the Democratic convention in Chicago this week is, very probably, a labor leader. The labor leader is Sidney Hillman, 57, of...

LABOR: Wars to Lose, Peace to Win

(See Cover) Standing in the ballroom of Atlantic City's Hotel Chelsea, Sidney Hillman last week cried: "You know the history of labor is division, and every...

National Affairs: Blackmail?

Tough-fibered little Sidney Hillman, who has so far survived all the violent winds of controversy in Washington, last week met a hurricane that threatened to...

National Affairs: Mr. Martin's Snuffles

Homer Martin, president of the United Automobile Workers of America, got the snuffles and took to his bed one day last week. They were lucky snuffles, for...

U.S. At War: The Power of P.A.C.

After the convention had run two days, the Chicago Tribune ran a front-page cartoon, in four colors, showing Sidney Hillman playing Cardinal Wolsey to Henry...

The Election: The Side Issues

The election settled a number of lesser issues all over the U.S. — at least temporarily. Foremost was the clear emergence of organized labor as an independent...

National Affairs: Easy Does It

"The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America . . . looks upon industrial warfare as a relic of uncivilized industrial practices. . . ." With 400,000 U.S...

See more Time.com Articles