Articles

LABOR: Mr. Green's Inning

Something very like a major crisis, political and financial, loomed before John L. Lewis' three-year-old C.I.O. last week. In Milwaukee, a regional meeting...

National Affairs: Green to Perkins

Last week Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins again exercised her genius for aggravating U. S. Laborites. Her annual report to Congress so graveled A. F. of L...

LABOR: Bannerless Man

Thumbing through his mail about a year ago, A. F. of L.'s President William Green came across a letter from Princeton, N. J. The missive suggested that in...

FOREIGN RELATIONS: Mr. Green. Regrets . . .

A.F. of L.'s William Green hurried into the White House. The President, flanked by Madame Frances Perkins, had a little suggestion to make. For ten years, Mr...

National Affairs: Green on Pins

C. L O.'s John L. Lewis last week bought a box for the opening in Washington of the union musicomedy Pins & Needles. A. F. of L.'s William Green therefore...

LABOR: Old Men Go West

Day after Samuel Gompers was laid in his grave in Tarrytown, N. Y. in 1924, the executive council of the American Federation of Labor announced his successor...

National Affairs: Sincerely Yours

John L. Lewis was back in character. He had stepped out of it long enough to butter up his old enemy, the A.F.L.'s President William Green as "the able Mr...

National Affairs: Holdup Men of Labor

Shall song and music be forgot When workingmen combine, With love united may they not Have power almost divine? Shall idle drones still live like kings . On...

LABOR: No Longer Judas

Homer Martin's feelings toward William Green last week boxed the compass. In 1935, when Mr. Martin's United Automobile Workers of America was an A. F. of L...

LABOR: New Boss of the A.F.L.

In the top-floor conference room of the American Federation of Labor's seven-story headquarters in Washington, the big portrait of William Green, late A.F.L...

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