Articles

Science: How Far the Moon?

Voyages to distant planets seemed blissfully easy a few years ago, because they were theoretical. Now that satellites, the first crude spaceships, are actually...

Science: Luna Park

There may be life of a sort on the moon, after all, despite its admitted lack of atmosphere. Fifty-five plats or fields of something which can best be...

People: Feb. 9, 1968

Gloomy words from Rocketeer Dr. Wernher von Braun, 55, darkened the tenth-anniversary celebration of the first U.S. satellite, the 31-lb. Explorer 1. Budget...

Space: The Moon-Faced Mars

When the full set of Martian pictures taken by the spaceship Mariner IV was released last week, Mariner's earth-bound master, Physicist William H. Pickering,...

Space: Changing Man's View

Not since Galileo pointed his primitive telescope at the stars some three centuries ago has man's view of the universe been so singularly changed. In its...

Education: Kudos: Jun. 17, 1966

UNIVERSITY OF AKRON Maxwell Davenport Taylor, LL.D., former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and former Ambassador to South Viet Nam. He has earned many...

Science: A Nice, Precise Operation

It blasted off from a secret U.S.S.R. test baseĀ—a huge rocket that hurled into orbit a huge satellite. The satellite separated into three parts, and one of them...

Science: 1958 Alpha

Even while on its Florida launching pad, the Army's satellite Explorer (official scientific name: 1958 Alpha) insistently broadcast its hoarse radio cry. Ten...

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