Articles

Books: For Better or Hearst

In 1935, Franklin D. Roosevelt wrote to a university president who had been accused by William Randolph Hearst's newspapers of harboring communists: "I sometimes...

Press: Examiner on the Block

What would William Randolph Hearst have made of it all? Had the legendary newspaper mogul (and inspiration for Citizen Kane) been hanging out on the 17th floor...

The Press: Hearstian Revival

In the late 1880s, Publishing Dynamo William Randolph Hearst's San Francisco Examiner helped to introduce sensationalism, jingoism and human interest into...

Press: Hearstiana

To the attention of the Securities & Exchange Commission in Washington last week came two of the most remarkable registration statements ever filed. Having...

The Press: Dusk at Santa Monica

(See Cover) One of the many little-known facts about William Randolph Hearst's fantastically tangled affairs is that his rival Los Angeles publisher, Harry...

Show Business: Pop's Girl

During the run of the Ziegfeld Follies of 1917, a man in his mid-50s kept reappearing in the audience night after night—always buying two tickets, one for...

The Press: Hearst Redivivus

Hearst is making money again. The greatest vegetable growth in publishing history—which William Randolph Hearst watered with his father's fortune, wrapped in...

The Press: Hearst Steps Nos. 2 & 3

A tall, heavy-hung gentleman in his seventies yet surprisingly quick-stepping, got off a train at Winslow, Ariz, one day last week and boarded a plane for San...

The Press: No. 2 Man

Jacob Dewey Gortatowsky, whose name means nothing to the public, last week firmed his hold as No. 2 editorial man in the Hearst empire. For 29 years he has been...

The Press: Hearst's Legacy

William Randolph Hearst is dead—as dead as yesterday's tabloid. But his name, like a faded headline, is a yellowing memento of the Yellow Age of U.S...

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