Articles

Books: For Better or Hearst

In 1935, Franklin D. Roosevelt wrote to a university president who had been accused by William Randolph Hearst's newspapers of harboring communists: "I sometimes...

The Press: Hearstian Revival

In the late 1880s, Publishing Dynamo William Randolph Hearst's San Francisco Examiner helped to introduce sensationalism, jingoism and human interest into...

Press: Hearstiana

To the attention of the Securities & Exchange Commission in Washington last week came two of the most remarkable registration statements ever filed. Having...

The Press: Dusk at Santa Monica

(See Cover) One of the many little-known facts about William Randolph Hearst's fantastically tangled affairs is that his rival Los Angeles publisher, Harry...

Show Business: Pop's Girl

During the run of the Ziegfeld Follies of 1917, a man in his mid-50s kept reappearing in the audience night after night—always buying two tickets, one for...

The Press: Hearst Redivivus

Hearst is making money again. The greatest vegetable growth in publishing history—which William Randolph Hearst watered with his father's fortune, wrapped in...

The Press: Hearst Steps Nos. 2 & 3

A tall, heavy-hung gentleman in his seventies yet surprisingly quick-stepping, got off a train at Winslow, Ariz, one day last week and boarded a plane for San...

The Press: No. 2 Man

Jacob Dewey Gortatowsky, whose name means nothing to the public, last week firmed his hold as No. 2 editorial man in the Hearst empire. For 29 years he has been...

DEMOCRATS: Hearst Issue

Ever since Publisher William Randolph Hearst visited Governor Alf Landon in Topeka last December, found the Kansas candidate to his liking and ordered his...

The Press: Hearst's Legacy

William Randolph Hearst is dead—as dead as yesterday's tabloid. But his name, like a faded headline, is a yellowing memento of the Yellow Age of U.S...

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