Articles

Letters, May 30, 1938

Barracuda Sirs: Come now! Not even TIME is qualified to report accurately the feelings of an obscure barracuda confronted by the beaming face of Franklin...

THE CONGRESS: Work Done, May 16, 1938

The Senate: ¶ By unanimous voice vote, approved the compromise tax bill drastically modifying the corporate surplus-profits tax, substituting flat rates for...

Automation: 1410 Is Watching

Today's Americans are a submissive lot. A generation ago, when someone suggested collecting everyone's fingerprints and filing them with the FBI, the civil...

SUPREME COURT: Questions on Segregation

After six months of study and discussion, the U.S. Supreme Court could still not make up its mind about the legality of racial segregation in public schools...

Medicine: Capital Cleanup

Gonorrhea flourishes in cities. It flourishes particularly in Washington, D.C.; only three* U.S. cities have more. Since 1941 the number of reported cases in...

WOMEN: Resolutions for Roses

According to legend, when Aphrodite emerged from the foaming sea, the earth was so eager to compete with the spectacle that it promptly produced the first rose...

CRIME: Rascal Sentenced

In the District of Columbia's Supreme Court last week Gaston Bullock Means, national rascal, stood with arms akimbo and a smile on his dimpled face, listening...

RACES: Recorders Recorded

Last week from the auditorium walls of Washington's new Department of Labor Building ten flat black & tan faces stared importantly out over a large audience...

The Hemisphere: Martyrdom Denied

After he was sentenced to death for his attempted assassination of President Harry Truman in November 1950, Oscar Collazo† showed no regret. Though he had lived...

Tough Times

The 43,000,000 people in twelve eastern states and the District of Columbia felt the hand of war a little heavier on them last week. No one could ride to a...

RELIEF: Snootiest People

A nice plump young man with a booming voice, a repetitive tongue and a Southern accent is George E. Allen, one of the three Commissioners of the District of...

Medicine: The Wounded Face

Two top-notch speakers on surgery at the District of Columbia Medical Society's 15th Scientific Assembly last fortnight charged that many battlefront and...

WOMEN: Spring Comes to Washington

On the day of the vernal equinox, whether it wants to or not, spring comes to the District of Columbia. On that day, each year, shivering photographers,...

THE CONGRESS: Order of the Senate

In 1860 the U. S. Senate sentenced one Thaddeus Hyatt to 90 days in the District of Columbia jail for refusing to testify in a Senate investigation of John...

Improbable Sale

The most improbable building in the U.S. to go on the auction block was last week advertised for sale. It was Washington's magnificent $3,500,000 Federal...

JUDICIARY: Pensions Out

Once a highschool teacher, small, grey, solemn Alfred Adams Wheat retains the manner and appearance of a pedagog. Born in New Hampshire of old Yankee stock,...

THE CONGRESS: In Re Morse

When Majority Leader Bob Taft and Minority Leader Lyndon Johnson proposed their nominees for committee membership in the Senate last week, one name was...

POLITICS: Conventions

The Republican state convention at Indianapolis last week disposed of the last large bloc of votes to be chosen before the national convention. To no one's...

THE CONGRESS: No Blackout for Washington

Jennings Randolph, 39, Democrat, of Elkins, W.Va., is chairman of the House District Committee, source of all House legislation affecting the voteless District...

The Press: Self-Made Success

Publisher Alvin Wiehle of the Washington Herald-Telegram writes with brutal candor. When a recent District of Columbia practice blackout flopped, Publisher...