Articles

THE AMERICAS: A Great Joy

Only two U.S. Presidents, Herbert Hoover and Franklin Roosevelt, ever made long tours of South America, and both trips yielded great dividends of good will...

THE CAMPAIGN: Pride of the Clan

(See Cover) In the midst of the crucial West Virginia primary last spring, Jack Kennedy sent a crisis message to his kid brother, Ted, 28, who was busily...

THE ELECTION: An Old Combination

Happy days, as Franklin Roosevelt's theme song went, were here again. And they got here again in a way that F.D.R. could well have appreciated: a Democratic...

The Americas: Two Views South

President Kennedy, eager to prove himself as good a neighbor as Franklin Roosevelt before him, decided to use this week's White House reception for Latin...

HISTORICAL NOTES: MacArthur & Yalta

When the State Department made public the Yalta record (TIME, March 28), Senate Democrats hastened to defend Franklin D. Roosevelt's secret concessions to the...

A Letter From The Publisher: Oct. 25, 1963

The more you can hammer against the tendency of the press to exaggerate simple facts and "dress up" essentially unimportant news, the more you will receive...

National Affairs: Precision Veto

Like Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman before him, Dwight Eisenhower met with stony stares when he urged Congress to give him the chance for an "item veto,"...

DEMOCRATS: Candidate in Orbit

(See Cover) In Annapolis, Joe Curnane, a Massachusetts undertaker who looks after Jack Kennedy's political interests in Maryland, hooked his forefingers in...

Nation: The Tractors (Contd.)

The 500 tractors Fidel Castro demanded as ransom for 1,200 imprisoned Cuban survivors of the Bay of Pigs invasion were ready, and the Tractors-for-Freedom...

THE ECONOMY: Environment for Prosperity

In the economic report sent to Congress last week, President Eisenhower moved into a large area of political philosophy between Herbert Hoover and Franklin...

Books: Death of a Ship

ABANDON SHIP! (305 pp.)—Richard F. Newcomb—Holf ($3.95). A truly proud ship was the heavy cruiser Indianapolis. Before World War II, she had served as an...

THE CAPITAL: Friendship

George Edward Allen, a Mississippian with deep political roots (his Uncle John of Tupelo managed to serve eight terms in Congress during the Reconstruction,...

The Press: No, No, No

Franklin D. Roosevelt called Washington Columnist Drew Pearson "a chronic liar." President Truman called him "an s.o.b." Last week Columnist Pearson got...

GOVERNMENT: The Popping Cork

For more than a month, charges of influence peddling have swirled around Thomas G. ("Tommy the Cork") Corcoran's visits and phone calls to Federal Power...

Letters, may 28, 1956

Champagne in the White House Sir: Your May 7 issue carries the statement that the christening of President Eisenhower's latest grandchild was the first such...

Education: Chief Bookmen

What is a U.S. President apt to read in his leisure time? In a slim new volume called Three Presidents and Their Books (University of Illinois; $2.50), a...

Books: Epilogue

TRIUMPH AND TRAGEDY — Winsfon Churchill—Houghfon Mifflin ($6). The last time Churchill saw Franklin Roosevelt was on board the U.S. cruiser Quincy, in the...

Music: Bad Boy at 60

Early in World War II the Shah of Iran wrote to his friend Franklin Roosevelt and asked him to recommend a composer who could set Walter Camp's "Daily Dozen"...

The Press: It Will Be Denied, But...

Ever since Franklin Roosevelt was President, the inside dope of Washington Columnist Drew Pearson has often been flatly contradicted by the White House—and by...