Mario Draghi: The Man Who Would Save Europe

Last year the 65-year-old Italian economist found himself — to the slow-dawning appreciation of governments and bankers from Beijing to Washington — the most prominent and powerful defender of European integration. “Super Mario” saved the euro, literally, at least in the short term. His heroics won him plaudits, but his fellow delegates among the world’s financial elite, gathering from Jan. 22 at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, will clamor to know how he believes the currency can overcome the huge existential challenges it still faces.

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Mario Draghi: The Man Who Would Save Europe

There is one reality for bankers, another for the rest of us. That is the lesson most easily drawn from the Jan. 10 press conference of the European Central Bank...

Super Mario Swoops In

Italy once brought to mind delightful images of the Pantheon and Pisa, Armani and Alfa Romeo. But with the euro-zone crisis raging on, any mention of Italy...

‘Super Mario’ Rides to the Euro’s Rescue

Over the summer, Mario Draghi, the governor of the European Central Bank, told the world that he would do “whatever it takes” to save the euro. On Thursday, what...

Can the Super Marios Save the Euro?

Over the past couple weeks, the hopes of the euro zone have been pinned on two Marios -- Mario Draghi, the newly installed president of the European Central...

The Savior of Europe

Europe has been rescued. No, I'm not talking about the deal over Greek debt that was much in the news recently. The real rescue of Europe is being managed...

The Big New Idea for Saving the Euro

The dramatic promise made on July 26 by Mario Draghi, the president of the European Central Bank, that he would do “whatever it takes” to save the euro, calmed...

Boosting The Bank's Credit

Mario Draghi's first task as Bank of Italy's new governor was accomplished the moment his name was announced — the respected No. 2 man at Goldman Sachs instantly...

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